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SD Cancer Coalition Recognizes Efforts to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening

A South Dakota physician and a health care facility are being recognized for their efforts to increase colorectal cancer screening as part of a national effort to screen 80 percent of the eligible population by 2018.

The South Dakota Cancer Coalition Colorectal Cancer Task Force has honored Dr. Daniel Heinemann, MD, a vice president and medical officer for Sanford Health Network, and Falls Community Health in Sioux Falls for increasing screening rates among their eligible patients. Dr. Heinemann was awarded the 80 percent by 2018 Champion of the Year Award and Falls Community Health received the 80 percent by 2018 Organization of the Year Award.

“Staff at Falls Community Health and Dr. Heinemann should be applauded for their hard work and dedication to increase colorectal cancer screening. Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in South Dakota,” said Karen Cudmore, cancer programs director for the Department of Health. “We know that colorectal cancer screening tests can save lives, but the reality is too many adults aren’t following the recommendation for regular screening beginning at age 50.”

According to the 2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey, just 65.8 percent of South Dakota adults aged 50 to 75 were up to date with colorectal cancer screening. The state and several partners are part of a national effort working toward the goal of increasing colorectal cancer screening rates to 80 percent by 2018.

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Men and women age 50 to 75 should talk to their healthcare provider about getting screened for colorectal cancer. For more information about screening, go to GetScreened.SD.gov.

Dr. Heinemann is pictured with (left to right) Kelly Hasvold, MBA, RN, CPHQ, Director Quality and Safety, Sioux Falls Region, Sanford Health; Abby Kuper, Manager of Employee Health Sioux Falls, Sanford Health; Dr. Daniel Heinemann, MD, a vice president and medical officer for Sanford Health Network; Jennifer Weiss, Improvement Advisor, Sanford Health Quality Department; Sarah Quail, Cancer Programs Coordinator, SD Department of Health.

Pictured is the staff at Falls Community Health in Sioux Falls.


The 2018-2019 SD DOH Cancer Programs Implementation Grant recipients under RFA #19CP0001 include:

Sanford Medical Center-$20,000
Sanford Medical Center will implement evidence-based nutrition interventions for cancer patients. As part of project efforts, an evidence-based nutritional screening tool, best practice alert, and nutrition services will be implemented for cancer patients.

Black Hills Pediatrics, LLP -$18,000
Black Hills Pediatrics, LLP will implement the following evidence-based interventions to increase human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates: client reminders, provider reminder and recall systems, and provider assessment and feedback.


HPV Vaccination Task Force Presents Recognition Awards

Andrea Polkinghorn, RN, Clinical Services Manager at Sanford Health was recognized as the HPV Vaccination Champion of the Year for her efforts to improve HPV vaccination rates. Andrea is pictured with Sarah Quail, SD Department of Health Cancer Programs Coordinator (left), and Tim Heath, SD Department of Health Immunization Program Manager (right).

Platte Medical Clinic was recognized as the HPV Vaccination Organization of the Year for their dedication to increasing HPV vaccination rates. Pictured from left are Sarah Quail, SD Department of Health Cancer Programs Coordinator; Lori Heath, RN at Platte Medical Clinic; Mindi Veurink, RN at Platte Medical Clinic; and Tim Heath, SD Department of Health Immunization Program Manager.


SD Comprehensive Cancer Control Program Recognizes Efforts to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening

A South Dakota health care professional and a health care facility are being recognized for their efforts to increase colorectal cancer screening as part of a national effort to screen 80 percent of the eligible population by 2018.

The state’s Comprehensive Cancer Control Program Colorectal Cancer Task Force has honored Sara Romeo, RN Navigator for Falls Community Health, and Sanford Health Family Medicine Clinics in the Sioux Falls Region for increasing screening rates among their eligible patients. Sara was awarded the 80 percent by 2018 Champion of the Year Award and Sanford Health Family Medicine Clinics received the 80 percent by 2018 Organization of the Year Award.

“The staff at the Sanford Health Family Medicine Clinics and Sara Romeo should be applauded for their hard work and dedication to increase colorectal cancer screening. Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in South Dakota,” said Karen Cudmore, cancer programs director for the Department of Health; “We know that colorectal cancer screening tests can save lives, but the reality is too many adults aren’t following the recommendation for regular screening beginning at age 50.”

According to the 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey, just 66.7 percent of South Dakota adults aged 50 to 75 were up to date with colorectal cancer screening. The state is part of a national effort working toward the goal of increasing colorectal cancer screening rates to 80 percent by 2018.

For more information about screening, go to GetScreened.SD.gov.

Sanford Clinic & Sanford Health Network received the 80 percent by 2018 Organization of the Year Award for increasing colorectal cancer screening rates. Pictured from left are Jill Ireland, SD Comprehensive Cancer Control Program Colorectal Cancer Task Force, Dan Heinemann, MD, Health Network Vice President and Medical Officer, Sanford Clinic and Sanford Health Network, and Terri L Carlson, Executive Director, Sanford Health.

Sara Romeo, RN, Falls Community Health Nurse Navigator, received the 80 percent by 2018 Champion of the Year Award for increasing colorectal cancer screening rates. She is pictured with (left) Sarah Quail, SD Department of Health Cancer Program Coordinator and (right) Jill Ireland, SD Comprehensive Cancer Control Program Colorectal Cancer Task Force.

 


CDC: Two shots enough for most young patients getting HPV vaccine

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now recommends that 11- to 12-year olds receive two doses of the HPV vaccine at least six months apart rather than the previously recommended three doses to protect against cancers caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV) infections. Teens and young adults who start the series later, at ages 15 through 26 years, will continue to need three doses of the HPV vaccine to protect against cancer-causing HPV infections. For more information, read the full MMWR.


Cancer Moonshot Task Force Report Released

The Blue Ribbon Task Force issued a report describing 10 transformative research recommendations for achieving the Cancer Moonshot’s ambitious goal of making a decade’s worth of progress in cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment in just 5 years. Read the report.